Ryalla Duffy 11th April 1959 – 10th March 2021

It was with great sadness that we learnt of the sudden passing of Ainlee Ryalla Duffy.

Ryalla had lived the life, lit many fires and told many stories.

Siobhan Spencer

Ryalla was well known to many ACERT members. She participated in the ROMED training in 2014 and, as well as participating actively in the training and discussions, she submitted an exceptional personal study.

“The period since [waggon time] has seen a gradual, intentional and unrelenting erosion of rights of an entire way of life, aided and abetted by legislation and media bias.”

Ryalla Duffy

Ryalla and her family went through endless enforcements themselves from 1987 in Sussex when they had to leave their own land. She was well known in the southern counties (as well as the Midlands).

Ryalla was an excellent representative for her people and Romany rights. She was very knowledgeable of the New Forest families and saw the comparisons of enforced camps and the final solution and wrote a chapter on this history of the “compounds” in the Patrin book as part of the Patrin project with the Monitoring Group, seeing the similarities of this particular aspect of Romany Gypsy history.

Ryalla worked hard in Lincolnshire and was responsible for getting the much-needed work undertaken on the Summergangs Lane site, in Gainsborough.

…. a wonderful character who fought continuously for her people and their rights and who was the author of several books and the star of 2 or 3 dvds.. She was also the subject of the classic Anglo Romani book ‘Born on the Straw’ by Dorothy Strange (1968). The community will miss her hugely and I shall miss a very dear friend. 

Bob Dawson

In 2005 Ryalla was one of the founder members of the National Federation of Gypsy Liaison Groups and took part in police training, parliamentary meetings and conferences.

Despite the knocks, it illustrates her sense of humour and the truth in life and how I would like to remember her.One of the last days we spent together was with Lord Bourne, for a heritage tribute as he laid a wreath at the grave of Private John Cunningham receiver of the Victoria Cross, in commemoration of the 100 years centenary of the Great War, a great day with her which, as usual, ended with great laughter.

Siobhan Spencer

She leaves behind her 4 daughters, 2 sons and all of 13 grandchildren.

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ACERT Condemns Government Bill

Press Release issued 19th March 2021

The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, 2021 will make accessing education impossible for nomadic Gypsy and Traveller children

The Advisory Council for the Education of Romanies and other Travellers (ACERT) is deeply concerned about the implications of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, 2021.

As a national UK charity working to ensure that Gypsy and Traveller children are able to access education at all levels, the new Bill will effectively serve to exclude the children of nomadic Gypsy and Traveller families from such public services. 

Through our active campaigning work over many years, we know very well the day-to-day challenges and struggles that are faced by families living on roadside sites. 

Being able to access services such as education can be hard enough without the damaging measures contained in this Bill, which will criminalise nomadism and severely disrupt the education of Gypsy and Traveller children. 

With family homes potentially being seized, as well as jail sentences (up to 3 months) and large fines issued (up to £2,500), the consequences of criminalising nomadism in the UK will be severe and damaging. 

ACERT aims to ensure equality of provision in education for Gypsy and Traveller children and we would urge the Government to look again at the Bill and to seriously think through the consequences of what is being legislated. 

The fundamental human right to an education for any child should not be dependent on where and how you live your life. The Government, through its actions, would seem to not share this view. 

The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, 2021 will make accessing education impossible for nomadic Gypsy and Traveller children

The Advisory Council for the Education of Romanies and other Travellers (ACERT) is deeply concerned about the implications of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, 2021.

As a national UK charity working to ensure that Gypsy and Traveller children are able to access education at all levels, the new Bill will effectively serve to exclude the children of nomadic Gypsy and Traveller families from such public services. 

Through our active campaigning work over many years, we know very well the day-to-day challenges and struggles that are faced by families living on roadside sites. 

Being able to access services such as education can be hard enough without the damaging measures contained in this Bill, which will criminalise nomadism and severely disrupt the education of Gypsy and Traveller children. 

With family homes potentially being seized, as well as jail sentences (up to 3 months) and large fines issued (up to £2,500), the consequences of criminalising nomadism in the UK will be severe and damaging. 

ACERT aims to ensure equality of provision in education for Gypsy and Traveller children and we would urge the Government to look again at the Bill and to seriously think through the consequences of what is being legislated. 

The fundamental human right to an education for any child should not be dependent on where and how you live your life. The Government, through its actions, would seem to not share this view. 

UK Gypsy and Traveller Education Charity Condemns Government Bill

The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, 2021 will make accessing education impossible for nomadic Gypsy and Traveller children

The Advisory Council for the Education of Romanies and other Travellers (ACERT) is deeply concerned about the implications of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, 2021.

As a national UK charity working to ensure that Gypsy and Traveller children are able to access education at all levels, the new Bill will effectively serve to exclude the children of nomadic Gypsy and Traveller families from such public services. 

Through our active campaigning work over many years, we know very well the day-to-day challenges and struggles that are faced by families living on roadside sites. 

Being able to access services such as education can be hard enough without the damaging measures contained in this Bill, which will criminalise nomadism and severely disrupt the education of Gypsy and Traveller children. 

With family homes potentially being seized, as well as jail sentences (up to 3 months) and large fines issued (up to £2,500), the consequences of criminalising nomadism in the UK will be severe and damaging. 

ACERT aims to ensure equality of provision in education for Gypsy and Traveller children and we would urge the Government to look again at the Bill and to seriously think through the consequences of what is being legislated. 

The fundamental human right to an education for any child should not be dependent on where and how you live your life. The Government, through its actions, would seem to not share this view. 

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