Improving outcomes for Gypsy Roma and Traveller Communities

ACERT has been asked to publicise a small funding stream opened by 3 government departments. ACERT is developing its own bid, but would be happy to cooperate with other organisations and individuals who have ideas they would like to develop.

The Department for Communities and Local Government, in collaboration with the Department for Education and the Department of Health, intends to run a pilot programme of work to improve the outcomes of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities.

We are looking for six pilot projects in the areas of community cohesion, educational attainment and health outcomes, and welcome bids from organisations with the vision and capability to deliver such interventions. To be eligible to receive the grant, an organisation must be a registered charity or have a charitable purpose. The successful bidder will also need to have a demonstrable record in delivering projects and working with Gypsy, Roma or Traveller communities, and have a credible community presence. read more

Searching for the Travelling People

Monday 26th February 5.30pm
Borderlines Film Festival @ The Courtyard, Edgar Street, Hereford, HR4 9JR

Please join us for a screening of ‘Searching for the Travelling People’

In 1964, The Ballad of The Travelling People was first broadcast on BBC Radio. Created by pioneering radio producer Charles Parker with folk musicians Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl, the ground-breaking ballad explored the lives of Gypsies and Travellers through their own words, giving a voice to a historically outcast people. In this short documentary, the renowned author and poet Damian Le Bas takes us on a journey across Britain to re-visit the people and places Charles Parker connected with more than 50 years ago. As the film reveals what has (and, importantly, hasn’t) changed in the five decades since Gypsies and Travellers spoke about their lives, Le Bas sets himself the challenge of creating a new modern ballad for the travelling people of today. read more

What’s the plan, Justine?

The recently published Race Disparity Audit told us nothing we didn’t know already:

Pupils from Gypsy or Roma backgrounds and those from a Traveller or Irish Heritage background had the lowest attainment of all ethnic groups throughout their school years. …. around a quarter of Gypsy and Roma pupils achieved a good level of development, making them around three times less likely to do so than average. At key stage 4 the disparity is wider; in 2015/16 the Attainment 8 score – an average of points scored for attainment in 8 GCSEs including English and Maths – for Gypsy and Roma pupils was 20 points compared with the English average of 50 points and 62 points for Chinese pupils. Gypsy and Roma pupils, and those from an Irish Traveller background, also made less progress compared with the average for pupils with similar prior attainment. They were also far less likely to stay in education after the age of 16 than pupils in any other ethnic group, with just 58% of Irish Traveller pupils and 62% or Gypsy and Roma pupils staying on in 2014/15, compared with 90% of White British pupils and 97% of Chinese pupils.(p.19) read more